Programs For Editing Part 2: Word

Carrying on from last time, today I’m going to be talking about the features I like to use in Word while editing and revising my writing. Today I’m talking about Word 2013, just in case you notice any differences with features or how to access them.

Long before all the fancy stuff I’ve used like Scrivener and Storify, there was Word. Ever since I had my first computer it’s been an essential for me. No matter what new fancy programs come out I’m fairly certain that Word will never be replaced. If I’m writing anything that isn’t a novel, it gets written in Word. Short stories, blog posts, you name it. In my experience it has the most useful and comprehensive spelling and grammar check, has a good layout and most of the features feel fairly intuitive. Probably worth noting that I said none of these things while writing my dissertation but nowadays I don’t need to worry about tables, graphics or citations so the rose tinted glasses have gone back on.

As with Scrivener, discussed last time, Word has the feature of comment bubbles and again as mentioned last time I make liberal and possibly excessive use of them. They serve the same purpose and benefits as discusses last week. Big thumbs up.

Now, UNLIKE Scrivener Word also has the track changes feature which I love for so many reasons. Track changes does exactly what it says on the tin – it shows you in a different colour what has been added, deleted, moved, and so on. This is especially good for if you’ve sent it out to someone and they have suggested certain tweaks and changes, you can see exactly what’s being proposed. It’s awesome. It can be great for identifying problem zones and for making sure what you’re changing is actually an improvement before doing any final changes.

Track Changes

On most of my short stories, pretty much all of this is normally red.

Not only does Word let you see changes as you look through the document, it can also collate all your changes and comments into a revision panel at the side (or the bottom, if you prefer) of your screen. This can be used to quickly jump from one change to the next if you’re reviewing your alterations. I also like to use it to judge how ready a story is for viewing by others. Lots of changes and I know it needs at least another pass. Just a handful and it’s probably ready for a second opinion.

Reviewing Panel

This is just the first paragraph. Editing is important.

Possibly my absolute favourite feature of Word for editing is the ability to combine documents. Send a short story out to multiple people and want all of their notes and adjustments in one place? No problem for Word. This was a feature I had no idea existed until last year and I have no idea how I stumbled across it but my goodness I’m glad I did. And what’s best is that it’s so easy to do. Sent out your document and got it back from people? Great! First step, open any document. Just any one. Then go to Review –> Compare –> Combine. Into “Original Document” I select one of the commented upon files, and into “Revised Document” I put another. This first time I tell it to create in a new document and hit the go button. BANG! All the comments are in this new document. If you have more to add, just repeat but make sure the new document you’ve made goes into “Original Document” and that you change the Show Changes option to “Original Document.” You don’t have to but it saves you ending up with lots of docs to delete after. This is just brilliant because it means you’re just working from a single document and all of your changes and feedback are right there. It makes things much easier to keep track of and decreases the number of times you have to go back over the same bits.

Combining

This is the combining screen. Very simple, just browse for required files.

In the new document, at first you get a scary scene with a window for each document. You just need to close those until only the combined document is left and you should be left with a standard looking page with all your comments there for you. Quick, easy and super handy.

Are the any features I haven’t mentioned that you consider essential? Have you forsaken Word all together for another program?

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2 responses to “Programs For Editing Part 2: Word

  1. One of my favourite and less-known Word features is the Document Map (View > Show/Hide > Doc Map). If you use header styles in your document (eg for chapter titles), you can use the map to easily navigate around your story. You can also drag/drop different sections (everything under a selected header), which makes scene reorganization really easy (necessary for horrible planners like me). This is a feature a lot of Scrivener users always brag about – but it exists in Word too! 🙂

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